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GEMEALOGY COLLECTfOW 



1 


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A, 



YEAR BOOK OF THE 

OLD SETTLERS' ASSOCIATION 




JOHNSON COUNTY, IOWA 

1916-1917 



OFFICERS OF THE 
JOHNSON COUNTY OLD SETTLERS' 
ASSOCIATION 



For the Year 1917 



President General Richakd M. Hoxie 

Vice-President Joseph Walker 

Secretary Henry J. Wieneke 

Treasurer. 0. A. Byington 

Necrologist Mrs. G. R. Irish 



Editors Year Book 

Miss Elizabeth Irish, 0. A. Byington 

Executive Committee: 

Miss Elizabeth Irish Horace Sanders 

Emery Westcott J. J. Metzger 

R. A. McChesney John McCollister 



Date of Annual Meeting for 1917 : August 30th 



1524726 



THE OLD SETTLERS' ASSOCIATION 
OF JOHNSON COUNTY, IOWA 

1917 



ANNUAL MEETING OF 1916 

The annual Meeting of the Old Settlers' Association of 
Johnson County, Iowa, was held in the City Park on Thurs- 
day, September 14th, 1916. The day was fair with a rather 
uncomfortably cool northwest wind. The attendance at 
the reunion was unusually large, it being estimated that 
more than five hundred participated in the picnic dinner on 
the grounds. 

A very interesting program was held at two o 'clock in the 
afternoon. The principal address was given by Hon. Wil- 
liam T. Coe, of Minneapolis, Minn. Mr. Coe was born and 
reared on the old Coe farm near Riverside and was well 
acquainted with many of the pioneers and their families. 
He gave an address that was largely devoted to reminiscen- 
ces of the early settlement and development of the county. 
His address was very interesting and was highly appre- 
ciated by the large audience which gave him throughout the 
closest attention. The address of Mr. Coe was followed 
by extemporaneous talks by several old settlers and visitors 
who were present. 

The program was interspersed by music by the Boys' 
Band and by songs given by Henry Horn and his family. 

The election of officers for the ensuing year resulted in 
the following selections: President, General Eichard M. 



4 



The Old Settlers' Association of 



Hoxie; Vice-President, Joseph Walker; Secretary, H. J. 
Wieneke; Treasurer, 0. A. Byington; Necrologist, Mrs. G. 
E. Irish. 

The following Executive Committee was appointed to 
prepare for the annual gathering in 1917 : Miss Elizabeth 
Irish, Emery Wescott, E. A. McChesney, Horace Sanders, 
J. J. Metzger, John McCoUister. 

The following is the statement of the finances of the Asso- 
ciation for the preceding year, as shown by the Treasurer. 



February 4th, 1916, Balance on hand..- $21.00 
September 18, 1916, membership and 

sale of annuals.-.. 64.65 

December 19, 1916, sale of annuals 4.00 

April 1st, 1917, sale of annuals and dues 10.30 



Total $99.95 

July 31, 1916, Secretary postage and 

cards $ 1.80 

September 16, 1916, expenses W. T. Coe 15.00 
October 25, 1916, Economy Co. Publish- 
ing year book 57.50 

November 3, 1916, music, Boy's Band.— 15.00 

Balance on hand 10.65 



Total $99.95 



JANE KIEKWOOD 

On September 1st, 1917 Mrs. Kirkwood, widow of Iowa's 
War Governor, will celebrate the ninety-sixth anniversary 
of her birth. The date of the annual gathering of the Old 
Settlers of Johnson County was appointed for August 30th 
in honor of the birthday of Mrs. Kirkwood, this being the 



Johnson County ^ Iowa 



5 



nearest convenient day of the week on which the meeting 
could be held. 

Mrs. Kirkwood is living in hale old age in the Iowa City 
home occupied by her continuously for more than fifty 
years. The writer recently called upon this venerable lady 
at her home and found her in excellent health and spirits. 
Her mental faculties are unimpaired and her memory of 
dates is truly remarkable. She reads the daily papers 
and evinces an active interest in current events of the day. 

Jane Clark Kirkwood was born near Mansfield, Ohio, on 
September 1st, 1821. She was married to Samuel J. Kirk- 
wood on December 27th, 1843. She distinctly remembers 
the interesting incident that the wedding was to have been 
on Christmas Day but was delayed two days for the com- 
pletion of the wedding suit of the groom. They made their 
home in Mansfield, Ohio, until 1855 when they removed to 
Iowa, settling on the farm over looking Coralville and 
which was occupied for many years by Ezekiel Clark. Gov- 
ernor Kirkwood engaged in milling — operating the grist 
mill at Coralville. He was engaged in this work when nom- 
inated and elected Governor of the State. 

In 1864 they removed to the well known Kirkwood home- 
stead in the southeastern part of Iowa City where Mrs. 
Kirkwood has ever since resided. The period of the his- 
tory of our country covered by Mrs. Kirkwood 's recollec- 
tions is very extensive. She well remembers making ban- 
dages for the soldiers of the Mexican war, nearly seventy- 
five years ago. She also remembers of assisting in scrap- 
ing lint for the making of clothing for the soldiers of that 
war. She has a distinct recollection of General Jackson. 
During the celebrated Log Cabin and Hard Cider campaign 
in 1840, which resulted in the election of General Harrison 
to the Presidency, Mrs. Kirkwood, then a young lady, re- 
members attending a political meeting in Mansfield ad- 
dressed by General Harrison. That he stood in a wagon 



6 



The Old Settlers' Association of 



in the midst of the crowd and held a reception prior to 
his speech which was delivered from the wagon. 

At the time of removal to Iowa City the railroads had 
not been extended to our city and they came by way of 
Peoria, Muscatine and Davenport. 

At the time of the civil war Mrs. Kirkwood was active 
in work for the soldiers. She donated linen and was active 
in promoting the comfort and welfare of men in the field. 

It is expected that Mrs. Kirkwood will be present at the 
Old Settler's reunion and it will be a great privilege to 
her countless friends and well-wishers to be present on 
that occasion and to greet this splendid lady who has been 
spared so long to the State. 



Contributed by Miss Elizabeth Ieish 

OLD SETTLERS' BIRTHDAY GREETINGS TO 
HENRY J. WIENEKE ON HIS EIGHTIETH 
BIRTHDAY 

In paying their respects to Henry J. Wieneke, secretary 
of the Johnson County Old Settlers' Association, its mem- 
bers feel that a definite milestone has been reached in the 
history of their organization. In Mr. Wieneke, on his 
eightieth birthday, is witnessed a local personality, whose 
connection with Iowa City has little short of a romantic 
interest. 

It was in the long ago, when Iowa was chiefly open 
prairie and virgin woodland, back in 1844, that little Henry 
came with his parents into territory that eventually devel- 
oped into the great agricultural state of the west. Grown to 
manhood, in partnership with his brother, Henry opened 
a bakery, this being one of the very first of its kind in this 
part of the country. Ten years later he pursued the trade 
of cabinet-making. 



f 



HENRY J. WIENEKE 



Johnson County, Iowa 



7 



When a call to arms and patriotism was heard in 1861, 
our friend responded, enlisting in Company B, Fourteenth 
Iowa Infantry. In 1863 he was transferred to the Seventh 
Regiment, Iowa Cavalry, and saw active service in the 
Northwest, in conflict with the Indians. He fought in the 
big battle under General Sully, in the following year, this 
resulting in the expelling of the Sioux tribes from the 
section. He was mustered out late in the same year, 1864, 
and returned to his home in Iowa City, where he has con- 
ducted a stationery and general notion store ever since. 

In the year 1884, Mr. Wieneke joined the Johnson County 
Old Settlers' Association, which had been founded about 
twenty years previously. He has been an ardent supporter 
of the organization, and having filled all the offices from 
president down. He is today Secretary. He was the orig- 
inator of the building of the log cabins in the Fair Grounds, 
as well as the two new cabins in the City Park, the latter 
being the new home of the Old Settlers' Association. 

In congratulating their old and constant friend, Henry 
J. Wieneke, on attaining four score years of life, his fellow 
settlers recognize one of the veteran residents of Johnson 
County, and one whose citizenship has contributed to Iowa 
City a long, useful and worthy career. Recognizing, too, 
the many and faithful services he has rendered the Old 
Settlers ' Association for so long a period, it is their sincere 
wish that the good health he enjoys, and for which they 
are grateful may continue far into the years to come, and 
bring in its train all that makes life worth living for himself 
and others. 

I'd like to have a birthday, too, 
A day of joy and no regrets. 
If I could have such luck as you. 
Whom friends remember 
And Time forgets. 



8 



The Old Settlers' Association of 



IN MEMORIAM 
By Mks. Ruth Ieish Pkestoe" 

On October 16, 1916, at Dubuque, Iowa, occurred tbe 
death of Mrs. Thomas M. Irish who for twelve long years 
had been a great sufferer and closely confined to her home. 
Mrs. Irish, whose maiden name was Margaret Ryan, was 
born at Waterford, Ireland, Christmas Day, 1843, and was 
the eldest daughter of Mortimer Ryan and his wife, Mary 
Summers Ryan. They came to America in 1847, living for 
a time at Portland, Maine. But the call of the great West 
appealed to Mr. Ryan and he came on to Iowa City in the 
early fifties where he established his permanent home and 
became one of the city's most prominent business men. 
Here his children grew up and were educated and here 
Margaret graduated from the State University in 1865 and 
for a time was one of Iowa City's most successful teachers. 
In 1867 she was united in marriage to Prof. Thomas M. 
Irish who was the third son of Capt. F. M. Irish and had 
been through childhood and youth a neighbor and close 
friend of Margaret's. 

Soon after their marriage Prof, and Mrs. Irish estab- 
lished their home in Dubuque, Iowa, where Prof. Irish was 
engaged in educational work. Here they reared their fam- 
ily whose lives were directed and blessed by Mrs. Irish's 
all absorbing love and devotion and here she endured the 
grief entailed by the loss of three of their children, bearing 
most bravely during her period of severe invalidism, the 
death of her eldest daughter Mary, a young woman of rare 
personal charm and Christian virtues. 

Despite great physical disabilities that would have 
caused despair in one less firm in Christian faith Mrs. 
Irish to the last bore up bravely and uncomplainingly, fill- 
ing in the hours of suffering by correspondence with absent 



MES, MAKGARET IRISH 



Johnson County, lotva 



9 



friends or in entertaining friends within the home where 
to the end she directed the affairs of her household and 
cheered the members of her family circle with her supreme 
courage and hope. 

Thus, for a period of nearly fifty years was the life of 
Mrs. Irish a real benediction to her husband and children 
and an example to the world of a true Christian woman- 
hood. 



THE OLD SETTLERS' MOURN DEATH OF 
MRS. SARAH L. FELLOWS, A BELOVED 
PIONEER OF IOWA CITY, IOWA 

Great sadness reigned in many Iowa City homes, when 
the death of Mrs. Sarah L. Fellows on July 14, was an- 
nounced. 

She was eighty-one years of age on December 19, 1916. 

She was a daughter of S. G. Matson a member of the 
Iowa Constitutional Convention, and a native of Vermont. 

Mrs. Fellows was the widow of the late Stephen N. Fel- 
lows, who came with her to Iowa City in 1868 to become a 
member of the University faculty — ^with which he was con- 
nected two decades. Dr. Fellows was a pioneer clergyman 
filling numerous Iowa pulpits early in his career, and in 
late years, after leaving the University, occupying pastor- 
ates at Waterloo and other points. 

The officiating clergyman at the funeral services was 
Rev. R. D. Parsons of Mt. Vernon, Iowa — who was pastor 
of the Methodist Church in Iowa City in pioneer days. 

Mrs. Fellows was a leader for many years, in the Metho- 
dist Church, and she affiliated with many of the enthusiastic 
and efficient organizations, wherein she served helpfully, 



10 The Old Settlers' Assoeiation of 



and lier deeds of charity and mercy were sown throughout 
the community. She was at one time a prominent President 
of the W. C. T. U. 

Surviving to mourn this ''good mother in Israel'' are one 
daughter and two sons, Miss Ora Fellows of Iowa City; 
Albion N. Fellows, of New York City, an alumnus of the 
College of Liberal Arts, Class of 1878; and Olin S. Fellows, 
of Middletown, N. Y., S. U. I. Liberal Arts 1880. 

The old settlers will mourn the loss of their pioneer 
friend, Mrs. Fellows. 



THE VOICE OF OTHER DAYS 
(A Favorite Poem of Dr. S. N. Fellows) 

How oft has life's unseen events 

O'erturned our hopes of bliss. 
And gathered to another world 

The friends we loved in this. 
And even now when they are gone. 

Whom fancy oft portrays. 
Upon the soul there seems to roll 

The voice of other days. 

We love to join with wild delight 

The circles of the young. 
And yield our tribute there to swell 

The magic of the tongue. 
But all ! we lose our mirthfulness 

And all our joy decays. 
When from the past there comes at last 

The voice of other days. 



Johnson County, Iowa 

We love to labor — labor here, 

We love. to toil — toil on, 
For so did they, who now from earth 

To their reward have gone. 
Yet oft we turn aside to weep 

•At Fate's uncertain ways. 
When o'er us comes, like muffled drums. 

The voice of other days. 

Our friends prove false and oft we feel 

Desponding' and alone, 
When not a kindred spirit gives 

The smile we love to own. 
But ever thus — when we are sad. 

And gloom around us plays. 
To cheer us then, there comes again, 

The voice of other days. 

Who spoke such kind and gentle words 

With us upon his kneel 
And sooth 'd our little throbbing hearts? 

Our Father, where is he! 
Gone — gone, and yet there often comes, 

Our drooping hearts to raise. 
From out the mist of scenes like this, 

The voice of other days. 

Oh, where is now that noble form! 

Our brother, where art thou! 
Within the wide Pacific's vale 

Thy dust reposeth now. 
Sad — sad to us that vale still seems. 

Which shines with golden rays. 
It bringeth back, our souls to rack, 

The voice of other days. 



12 



The Old Settlers' Association of 



And where, alas, that gentle one f 

Who sooth 'd our pain and fearf 
Thou too art gone, and we must mourn 

Our mother kind and dear. 
But oft we feel upon us steal. 

That every feeling sways, 
The cadence soft we've heard so oft. 

The voice of other days. 

How cold this world to us appears. 

When no sweet voice is heard. 
To claim our triumphs and to speak 

A kind approving word ! 
But ah ! when all we are below 

Stern Death in ruin lays. 
We'll hear once more, as oft of yore. 

The voice of other days. 



AMUSEMENTS OF PIONEER DAYS 
Narrated by Mrs. S. A. Irish 

The American people have ever been fond of sports and 
amusements and the pioneers, despite their severe toil and 
many deprivations, were no exception to this rule. 

The catch -penny shows for their day were few and far 
between and greatly enjoyed, when they came, by both old 
and young. Of these amusements of pioneer days the In- 
dian dances and the cross-country shows drew the biggest 
crowds and were the greatest thrillers. A band of Sac and 
Yo\ Indians, whose camp was on the Iowa River south of 
tlie James McCollister farm, used to come up to Iowa City 
not infrecjuently, and, for a purse would give their gro- 
tesfjue corn dance, fox trot, and war daiice. 




A FACSIMILE OF YE OLDEN TIME CIRCUS OF 1848 
BY THE LATE GEN. CHAS. W. IRISH 



Johnson County, Iowa 



13 



The war dance was wild in the extreme and served for 
weeks afterward as a basis of bad nightmares for children, 
as well as outlandish pranks for half grown boys. But the 
real event of the summer season for both old and young, 
then as now, was the coming of the show. In 1848 one came 
and set up its attractive tents on the ground near to the 
State House, now the central building of the State Univer- 
sity group. 

The pioneer children and their parents enjoyed this cir- 
cus immensely. The frisky monkeys, talking parrots, and 
many strange animals found beneath the canvas, as well as 
the powerful elephants that beseechingly held out their 
trunks to little children for proffered cookies and candy 
were all objects of great interest and curiosity, but the 
thing that made the big audience hold its sides in uncon- 
trollable laughter was the jolly clown. 

The pioneer circus had no double ring and that clown 
furnished themes enough for conversation and antidotes for 
blues to last the community until the circus came again 
next year. And come it did with all of its wonderful attrac- 
tions, even to the short skirted girl — then so rare a speci- 
men that she could only be found in the circus ring riding- 
two bare-backed horses at once, a foot on the back of either 
as they sped along at break-neck speed, while she ever and 
anon would jump through a paper covered hoop held in 
her path by a clown and land each time safely on the backs 
of her steeds without the loss of a moment or a tear of her 
tinseled gown. 

The coming of the show across country in pioneer days 
before there were railroads was a great event. The caravan 
of heavily loaded and gayly decorated wagons drawn by 
strong and beautiful horses was a magnificent sight to 
every one and especially to the children who were fortunate 



14 



The Old Settlers' Association of 



enough to live within seeing distance of the road over which 
the caravan traveled. Then, too, the elephants and camels 
that lumbered along in the grand procession added much 
to the interest of the caravan, especially when on bad roads 
when mud was deep and heavy and the horses would stick 
with their loads. Then the elephants would be brought 
up to give service by helping to get the loads out of the 
mire. 

I recall one such occasion when the wagons were stalled 
in fording the Iowa river at the old ford just above the 
Burlington street bridge. The monster elephant was called 
to the rescue. He walked majestically into the water and 
with a display of calmness and great good sense lifted and 
pushed on the wagons while the horses pulled. Soon all 
were safely landed on the west side of the river and were 
wending their way up the Fletcher hill enroute to Marengo, 
their next «stop. 

The circuses of Pioneer days attracted people for miles 
around, just as they do in these days and not a few of the 
jokes that made the folk of that day and generation laugh 
are still considered by the generation of today ^'ioo funny 
for anything.'' And such indeed was my experience when 
I accepted, in company with some other little girls, an invi- 
tation to ride around the circus ring on the elephant's back 
at one of the performances of the circus in 1849. The ring 
was about where the S. U. I. Science building now stands 
and we youngsters certainly had the time of our lives in 
those few moments of adventurous ride. I think the fact 
that we realized that we should be the envy of all our play- 
mates for months to come sustained us through that trying- 
ordeal when we felt that the gaze of hundreds in that large 
audience was focused upon us as we rolled and jolted along. 

Little did I then dream that I was being watched by the 
yoiitli that later on should make me his life's partner, but 



1524726 



Johnson County, Iowa 15 

so it was, and in later years it was Ms delight to tease me 
telling our friends that the first time he met the girl whom 
he chose for a wife she was riding the elephant in a circus. 
Many years after the event when we were gray-headed 
grandparents, my husband made a beautiful pen and ink 
sketch of a young woman riding an elephant in the circus 
before a throng of people who were gazing up at her admir- 
ingly. This sketch of ''My Wife when I First Saw Her'' 
he photographed and presented copies of it to relatives and 
a few friends who understood the joke. 

I do not recall the name of the show that came to Iowa 
City in 1848, but in 1853 or '54 Yankee Robinson came along 
with his big menagerie and he brought a greater number 
of strange animals than had ever been seen before west of 
the Mississippi. The elephant with this show was called 
Betsy. She was a huge creature and possessed of great 
sense and a tremendous capacity for food as I had ample 
opportunity to discover, for she tarried a while in our gar- 
den having dropped behind the large caravan one night as 
it passed our house on its way to Cedar Rapids. Mrs. 
Wiggs in the cabbage patch could never have created such 
a commotion and devastation as did Betsy. Early in the 
morning following circus day we were awakened by a ter- 
rific sound which proved to be Betsy trumpeting, perhaps 
giving thanks for a full stomach. At least that was what 
we thought when, startled from our dreams by her sonorous 
voice, we rushed to our windows to discover that she had 
taken down a span of our rail fence and had laid the garden 
bare. Not a vestige of cabbage or sweet corn was left and 
between her trumpetings she was devouring our sweet po- 
tatoes. Scared almost to death, I, who had bravely ridden 
on the back of one of her compatriots, stepped timidly forth 
upon the porch to shoo the pachyderm away. But I hur- 
riedly retraced my steps for she raised her head and trunk 



16 



The Old Settlers' Association of 



in a way tliat warned me that it was not yet time to bring 
the crumb brush and tray to the feast. 

The only man on the place at the time had to leave my 
sister and me alone with her majesty while he, by devious 
windings in and out, behind the barn, and back through a 
neighbor's corn field, and thence out through the woods to 
the Dubuque road, came at last upon Betsy's keeper sound 
asleep upon the road where he had fallen from his horse 
and relaxed his hold upon Betsy when overcome by weari- 
ness. The attendant, when aroused by our man, very cour- 
teously returned with him and after viewing the wreckage 
of our garden, paid five dollars for the damage, then turning 
to Betsy said, ^^Come, we must go or we will be too late 
for you to do your part in the circus at the Eapids. ' ' Betsy, 
without a murmur or a moment of hesitation, turned and 
followed him peacefully down the road. Thus together 
vanished forever the treasures from our garden and the 
wise old elephant. She, departing, left her footprints upon 
the sands of the Dubuque road, and they were so firmly 
impressed that many of them could still be seen there the 
following summer and it was great fun for us youngsters 
to run along the road hunting Betsy's tracks on our way to 
school. 

Yankee Robinson's show gave way to that of P. T. Bar- 
num's and he introduced many circus rings and many 
clowns into the performances. But time and space are too 
brief for me to say anything of this Greatest Show on 
Earth" except that Buffalo Bill began his ^^Wild West" 
show as part of Barnum's attractions. I doubt not there 
are many old settlers beside myself who still recall his 
]>uffalo hunt given in the big tent that caused such a com- 
motion when one of the buffaloes broke from the ring and 
charged in among the audience. Women fainted — children 
screamed — pick-pockets plied their trade! When quiet was 



Johnson County, Iowa 



17 



restored many of the audience found themselves divested of 
their cash or other valuables. I lost a fine new wrap on this 
occasion, which caused me to resolve Never to go to a cir- 
cus again, unless I had to take my grand-children." 

What a comforting cloak grand-children are, anyway, 
when a show comes to town! 



NECROLOGIGAL EEPOET 



JOHNSON COUNTY OLD SETTLEKS ASSOCIATION 



AUGUST, 1916 

NAME AGE DATE NAME 

Thomas L. Bolton 39 23 George Eandall 

Ellen Augusta Price 44 14 

SEPTEMBER, 1916 



AGE DATE 
.70 — 



Fred Atkins 60 3 

Alexander Grace 62 3 

N. W. Cotton 85 3 

J. F. Luse 55 18 

Mrs. Margaret Eeese 86 21 



Samuel D. Green 69 22 

Eev. William Bayard Craig 70 15 

Mrs. Alexander Norison . . , . 96 23 

Mrs, Joseph Dvorsky — 24 

Edward White 69 30 





49 


5 




85 


6 


E. M. Stevens 


.63 


8 




61 


8 




.62 


10 




,74 


16 


Mrs. Kate Melicher 


89 


16 


Mrs. Delia Eppel Chapek. 


. .47 


14 



OCTOBEE, 1916 

Mrs. Jacob McVey 82 16 

Mrs. Sarah Jack Eaton 71 5 

Matt Carson ....77 27 

Mrs. Martha McClelland ... 98 29 
Mrs. Agnes McElwain Burge 

72 29 

Mrs. C. B. McLaughlin 78 29 



The Old Settlers' Association of 



NAME 

Jacob Hotz 63 1 

Mrs. James Dvorsky 59 3 

David Jayne 72 4 

Orland J. Gowey 66 6 

Herman Holcher 48 9 

Geo. H. Van Patten 84 14 

Mrs. David Croy 48 9 



NOVEMBEE, 1916 

AGE DATE NAME 



AGE DATE 



Simeon A. Lombard 72 9 

Adam Amish 84 17 

John T. Struble 88 27 

Mrs. H. D. Sumner 80 28 

John Jack 74 3 

Mrs. Catherine Green 86 29 

William Fry 66 26 



DECEMBEE, 1916 

Mrs. Joseph Hedges. — 3 Mrs. L. A. Clearman 64 24 

Geo. Eden 52 — Mrs. Lawrence Ford 85 27 

Mathias Maher 89 30 Mrs. Josephine Gordon 66 28 

Mrs. Mary Warey Troyer. ..83 21 Balser Hormel 86 24 



JANUAEY, 1917 

Mrs. Eose Apitz 75 

Mrs. Wm. Kindle 35 

Mrs. Jennie Hobbs Eobotham 

79 

Mrs. M. F. Shaffer 73 

Mrs. Anna B. Spevacek. . . . 70 
Mrs. Sarah Startser 84 



5 


Jos. Daniel Long 


. . 33 


15 


7 


John D. Colony 




15 




D. Eummelhart 


. . .82 


15 


7 


Jos. Dolish 




20 


6 


Mrs. Mary Stiner 


. . .85 


22 


7 


Mrs. Catherine Eeilly 


. . .88 


22 


5 


Henry J. Evers 


. . ,83 


29 


14 


Joseph Buchmayer 


., 77 


29 



FEBEUAEY, 1917 



Mrs. Jennie Williams Hardy 70 

Mrs. Mary Gallagher 84 

Mrs. Ellen G. McClain — 

Mrs. Elizabeth Weldy 91 

Mrs. Ella Trotter Gaymon. .67 
Mrs. Kate Ham Fordyce ... 86 
Mrs. Kate Beecher Shay ... 48 
Martin Wanick 90 



1 
2 
3 
5 
5 
2 
11 
12 



Lester McKray 90 

Dr. J. B. Carder 65 

W. A. Eohret 60 

William H. Slaughter 80 

Joseph A. Lutz 60 

Norton Wical 50 

Mrs. Lenora E. Beeny 29 



MAECH, 1917 



Mrs. Minnie Cherry. 



Chas. 



12 
15 
24 
15 
26 
2 
27 



41 


2 


Samuel Hughes .... 


.86 


3 


.65 


3 


Mrs. Martha Jane Harrison 84 


22 


,■82 


4 


Mrs. Mary Donovan. . . . 




25 


82 


8 


Frank Chansky .... 




24 


.73 


12 


Henry A. Huffman 




27 


70 


6 


Mrs. Mollie Shipton Gullet. 


.56 


11 


.80 


14 


Mrs. Caroline Fankhouser. 


.81 


27 


.71 


15 


Thos. 0. Thomas 


.85 


30 


.45 


6 


Ida Eonan 




30 


.61 


€ 









Johnson County, Iowa 



19 







APRIL, 


1917 






NAME 


AGE 


DATE 


NAME 


AGE 


DATE 


Mrs. Frank Anthony 


33 


3 


Frederick Theobald 


79 


24 




,73 


9 


Mrs. Sylvester Wombacher. 


.65 


24 


Elmer F. Clapp 


74 


12 


Mrs. Pardon Alderman... 


.68 


24 






11 


Mrs. ±ila Cutler Ady 




26 






15 


-Kurus iVL. Jsixby, Sr 




26 












.69 


19 


Mrs. Sarah Johnson 


70 


9 






MAY, 


1917 






Mrs. Clara Stone Sanxay. . 


.67 


1 


Isaac M. Emmons 


69 


11 


Mrs. Emily H. Wellman. . . 


.61 


7 


John Ringland 


65 


5 


Miss Louise Frances Lloyd. 


.63 


4 


Mrs. Ada Sangster Kennard 64 


22 


Mrs. Pauline Keppler Sehaedler 




Mrs. Peter Musser 


,73 


23 




55 


5 


Charles E. Colony 


.83 


24 




74 


7 




,68 


— 


M!rs Anna Zenisliek 


92 


o 

o 


Olive Mae Seydel 


,21 


26 






JUNE, 


1917 








75 


3 




,95 


25 




67 


10 
y 




84 




Frank H. Herring 


,55 


Douglas Williams 


.56 


23 


Chas. Westfall 


,55 


15 


Albert Frederic Drews 


72 


26 


Mrs. Hessia Cook 


75 


12 


Mrs. Chris Senner 


.65 


30 




■83 


19 


S. A. Hochstedler 




24 






JULY, 


1917 




Clifford M. Huff 


35 


5 




,77 


26 


Mrs. Geo. Powell 


81 


9 
8 


Dennis Maloney 


97 


26 


Prof. Nathan R. Leonard. 


, .85 




,63 


30 




70 


10 


Mrs. Anna Jeannette Harkness 




F. A. Forbes 


. .55 


12 




63 


tlx) 


Mrs. Sarah Fellows 


82 


14 










AUGUST, 1917 






Frank Parizek , 


71 


5 


Mrs. Celestia E. Wilson.., 


, .77 


10 


Peter Zahner 


75 


9 









Respectfully submitted, 

(Signed) Mrs. G. R. Irish. 



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